Swing High (Spider-Man: Homecoming, 2017)

Spider-Man-Homecoming-PosterSpider-Man has the distinction of having been rebooted three times in the last fifteen years.  Both the Raimi Films and the Marc Webb films have good points.  Raimi’s Spider-Man 2 is a high point for super-hero themed films.  But they also never quite fully got Spider-Man as a character.  Maguire’s Peter Parker could be to goofy, while Garfield’s Peter was to moody and mopey.

Sony hit some hard times, made all the worse by a major hack that exposed all sorts of internal issues.  One thing it revealed?  Sony had talked with Marvel about a deal that would allow Spider-Man to be a part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.  The talks fell apart before the hack.  But this brought them back to life.

Sony decided to let Marvel bring a heavy creative hand in.  In exchange, Sony got to include MCU characters in their Spider-Films.  The MCU introduced Spider-Man into their world via Captain America: Civil War.  Spider-Man was a highlight of that film.  And rather than try to retrofit Peter Parker in, as if Spider-Man had been there all along… they stepped into his career early, so he is new on the scene.

Homecoming picks up roughly eight months after Civil War, with Peter enjoying using his Stark supplied super-suit and anxiously awaiting his next big Avengers mission.  Which seems to never come along.  Instead, Peter races around trying to get better by fighting street crime and helping lost old ladies.  His day to day life has, of course, been tougher since Tony Stark has come into his life, and he starts to withdraw to make more time.  He dreams of beautiful classmate Liz and hangs out with his closest friend Gan-uh-Ned.  Of course, he makes a major discovery, the adults don’t listen and Peter over-confidently decides to take on guys who may be out of his league.

One of the refreshing story points is that this is not about Peter learning about “with Great Power comes Great Responsibility”…at this point, he has learned that lesson.  We only get vague reference to Uncle Ben’s death.  In fact, the origin of Spider-Man is tossed out in a two second exchange.

Holland’s Peter Parker is sweet and awkward…his Spider-Man is quippy, but still learning.  He is not yet the confident Peter Parker, he practices lines, tries to get into a good pose before alerting bad guys to his presence.  But of the previous film versions, this is easily the strongest portrayal of Peter.  He may be in-experienced, but there are just so many things that make this version…well Spider-Man.

The rest of the cast of characters are updated in some interesting ways.  Ned Leeds is really Ganke from the Miles Morales Spider-Man comics, and he is a very fun character.  This is largely due to the comic timing and enthusiasm of actor Jacob Batalon.  I was most hesitant about Marisa Tomei as Aunt May…not because of her acting ability…but because she is only a few years older than me…and she feels more youthful and vibrant than traditional portrayals of Aunt May.  But I ended up really liking her in the role.

Michael Keaton’s Vulture is a terrific improvement on the character.  I never really cared for the comic version…he never seemed like he was all that much of a threat.  And the green suit did not help.  Keaton’s performance is solid and menacing…yet his motives are understandable.  He is a guy who wants to provide for his family, and saw secret government agencies undercutting his business.  He turns to crime to make up for that.  The Vulture look is a nice combination of modern with hints of his original look.  It works very well.

The action scenes are all nice and effective.  Sometimes these films can get confusing during busy action scenes.  Homecoming makes the action easy to follow.  And the film is infused with humor.  While theses were not absent from the previous versions, it is much more present here.  And yet, the humor is not at the expense of Peter’s character.  He feels the heavy weight of responsibility, regardless of his experience.

Admittedly, the film does not break new ground for Spider-Man…but I think it may be the best of the Spider-Man films so far.  Or, at worst, a close second to Raimi’s second Spider-Man film.  This is a fun film, and fun should be part of (a lot more) super-hero films.  Being overseen by Marvel, there are plenty of easter eggs…but what Marvel is usually really good about is that the easter eggs are a bonus for fans who love the comics…and if you have not read the comics, you won’t feel like you are missing something.

Honestly, I recommend seeing Spider-Man: Homecoming in the theater.  It benefits from being seen with an audience.

Food and Family (Chef, 2014)

chef-posterJon Favreau’s directorial career has managed a fair number of big budget hits.  He set the tome for the Marvel Cinematic Universe with the first two Iron Man films, and earlier this year wowed viewers with the Jungle Book.  After the failure of Cowboy’s and Aliens, Favreau directed a string of episodes of high concept TV shows before returning to the screen with Chef.

Favreau plays Carl Casper.  Carl is a gifted Chef who was a rising star.  But he finds himself feeling trapped, unable to truly work his creative juices.  His boss does not share his culinary aspirations.  He wants Carl to stick the script they have had for years.

Karl is struggling personally, trying to be a dedicated father, who is also not really over his Ex-Wife.  They have a friendly relationship, and she is actually very supportive of him.  But she also wants him so be better at being in their son’s life.

When they find out that a renowned food critic is coming to town Carl and his boss have an argument over what to serve…and the meal Carl is forced to make is panned by the critic.  Carl has a meltdown that goes viral.  Karl’s son introduces him to Twitter…which turns out to be a bad idea in that time.  Carl lacks the emotional strength to not lash out at every insult.

Karl finds himself so humbled that he finally caves in to the suggestion of his wife to buy a food cart from her ex-husband (the guy who came after Carl).  What follows is an emotional journey for Carl and his son. With the help of his chef friend Martin, they revamp the food truck and travel back home serving Cuban sandwiches.  Carl shares his favorite foods along the way with his son as they bond.

Chef is a delightful film that touches the heart (and stomach, I was totally hungry by the end of the film).  Favreau’s both frustrating and yet likeable.  You want him to figure it all out, to get out of his rut.  To reconnect with his son.  Repair the damage done to his relationships.  Emjay Anthony is terrific as son Percy.  He and Favreau connect wonderfully.  This is a really terrific little film, I genuinely loved and recommend Chef.

Rebellious Teens (Avengers: Age of Ultron, 2015)

Avengers-Age-of-Ultron-PosterAs with every sequel, things must get bigger and louder.  Unlike the first film, the danger really comes from within.  Tony is obsessed with changing the way things are done by building a peace keeping for that will put an end to the need for the Avengers.  He has been working on an A.I. to watch over the world and prevent tragedy.  Even as the Avengers are in action, he has Iron Man like robots trying to do crowd control.  But the people are not as confident.

When Tony gets access to some Asgardian technology, he recklessly uses it to try and jump a hurdle with his A.I.’s processing power.  Of course it goes wrong, resulting in a mad child called Ultron.  Ultron constantly works to better himself.  And one goal is to put an end to the Avengers.  Not quite in the way Tony anticipated…he was thinking retirement.  Ultron is thinking annihilation.  To better reach those ends, he brings brother and sister Pietro and Wanda Maximoff.  The orphans consented to Hydra experiments that have given them super-powers.  Pietro is the super-fast Quicksilver and Wanda has reality warping powers.

In a confrontation with Ultron, the Scarlet Witch manipulates several Avengers, including the Hulk who goes on a rampage.  Eventually the reveal of Ultron’s plans (including wiping out the human race) horrifies his cohorts.  His continuing evolution actually leads to the introduction of a new character for the MCU.  The Vision is introduced when the Mind Stone and lightening (along with the Jarvis AI) are combined to create the Vision.

Age of Ultron tries to be the Empire Strikes back, and is certainly loaded with darker themes than the previous films.  The performances are strong, and when the Scarlet Witch exposes Iron, Cap, Black Widow, Thor and the Hulk to their greatest fears of their past or potential futures, it threatens to break their bond apart.

The action is top notch.  There are several excellent and memorable fight sequences.  The jokes mostly land (but who thought it was a good idea for Tony to suggest if he can lift Thor’s hammer that he would reinstate the practice of kings sleeping with new brides on their wedding night).  There are a couple running jokes that can be particularly entertain.  The running gag about lifting Thor’s Hammer (which has a very good payoff) is especially fun.

The movie gives more attention to Hawkeye.  There was talk that Renner was very frustrated with the path the character took in the first Avengers.  This may be Whedon’s way of saying “sorry” to Renner.  It also establishes firmly the friendship with Natasha.

The effects are very good.  Vision looks very close to his comic book counterpart, without looking to fake.  Yet he is slightly unnatural.  Which is kind of the point.  Bettany gives life to the role.  It only took his seven years to be more than a voice-over (now he is a motion capture voice-over).

The film faced some criticism over Natasha calling herself a monster to Bruce Banner.  Some viewers felt the takeaway was that Natasha saw herself as a monster due to being sterilized.  I don’t know that I accept it was that clear cut.  Because the film is quite direct that it is the idea that she was a cold and efficient killer, and the folks who sterilized her believed this would make her that cold and efficient killer.  But I will agree it was somewhat clumsy in the writing, and Whedon deserves the credit for that.

In the end, I enjoyed this second outing with the Avengers.  It has some weak points, but nothing that ruined the overall enjoyment.

I Will Avenge Thee (the Avengers, 2012)

Avengers-Movie_PosterThe Avengers was the culmination of four years of effort on the part of Marvel Studios.  They worked to establish their interconnected Universe building up to this.  People were excited and the Marvel Machine had primarily seen success with their films leading up to this.  The first hiccup was losing Edward Norton.  Ed and Marvel could not come to an agreement for the Avengers.  So Marvel brought in the likable Mark Ruffalo.  The other big announcement was that Joss Whedon would direct.  He did not have that many movies under his belt, but he did have a few beloved television series, so as an overseer for the Cinematic Universe, he seemed well suited.

Loki is the central villain of the film, working with an alien race called the Chitari.  The film moves quickly to introduce the core members to each other, with a brief but exciting “Heroes meet, misunderstand the situation and fight” sequence.  This is an old comic book trope, and Whedon makes it work, and does not drag it out.

Once the heroes are brought together, they capture Loki who has a devious plan.  His escape leaves the team in shambles and a supporting character dead (but don’t worry, he got better for the S.H.I.E.L.D. TV series).  This, of course, encourages the heroes to band together and defeat Loki and stop the alien invasion.

Whedon proves himself to be quite skilled with both small moments and spectacle.  The final battle is exciting and full of grand heroics as Captain America takes charge.  We see him as a wise strategist.  When a police officer questions why they should listen to his instruction, he takes out an alien assault, no questions as the officer starts telling his men to implement Cap’s plan.

The introduction of Black Widow is pretty classic.  It is one of those “damsel in Distress” sequences where you realize the bad guys never had a chance.  The cast has an amazing amount of chemistry.  Even their bickering is engaging.  The film has the rapid quippy dialog Whedon is known for in shows like Buffy and Firefly.  Ruffalo fits in to the crew seamlessly.  As much as I like Norton and his Bruce Banner, Ruffalo manages to make the character all his own.  It is all quite engaging.

I feel the biggest lapse in judgement is having Hawkeye spend the first half of the film as a possessed lackey of Loki.  It just feels like the character deserves better than that.

While there is weight of imminent destruction, the film never gets too dark.  You have lighter moments to even it all out.  The Avengers was overall a great success that is a lot of fun to watch.

Burning Love (Iron Man 3, 2013)

Iron-Man-3-IMAX-poster

When they announced Iron Man 3’s villain there was concern  The Mandarin was a character with a rather troubling past.  An evil magical Asian.  Then they announced he was being played by Ben Kingsley.  He isn’t an example of Whitewashing exactly (Kingsley is not white).  But in the end, this was not the big concern for most viewers.  Favreau was out…Lethal Weapon scribe Shane Black was in.

Borrowing from the comic’s Extremis story-line, Tony runs into a guy trying to outdo his armor by creating soldiers who don’t need armor.  They are living weapons.  The problem is that they are volatile and prone to exploding.  Then there is the mysterious terrorist the Mandarin.  As Tony finds the situation escalating, he goes into hiding.  He is still struggling with Post Traumatic Stress for the alien invasion in the Avengers.  As it all comes together Tony discovers a few twists, including the possibility the terrorist organization does not even exist.

As usual, the cast is stellar, and Kingsley’s reveal is entertaining.  Though as the Mandarin he has this weird southern drawl that seems…out of place. But other than that, the performances  are quite good.

Of all the action sequences, there is a sequence where Iron Man saves people in freefall that is just great.

The effects are strong, though at times the powers seem arbitrary.  People with Extremis technology exhibit some really random powers (such as breathing fire). They do look pretty cool though.  Also, the ending seems to make no sense.  Tony destroys all his armor for…I guess…reasons?  It feels like they were trying to put a stamp of closure on the Iron Man franchise when we knew he would be back for another Avenger’s movie.

All in all, I found Iron Man 3 a bit of an improvement over the second film.  It has intrigue, action and humor.

 

Strike While the Iron Is Hot (Iron Man 2, 2010)

iron-man-2-posterSeriously…Iron Man 2… not Invincible Iron Man???  What a miss…

Anyways, The first Iron Man was a surprise hit.  Marvel was building towards their shared movie universe and did not want to mess that up.  So, they stuck to their guns.  Favreau was back to direct Downey Jr. and the entire cast that survived made it back for the sequel.

Well, almost everyone.  Terrence Howard tried to renegotiate his fee, and Marvel was not interested…so they asked him to not let the door hit him on the ass and brought in Don Cheadle.  I was pretty torn.  I thought Howard did well and was likeable as Jim Rhodes.  On the other hand?  Love Don Cheadle.

One of the harder parts of Iron Man is his rogues gallery. He fights a lot of armored guys.  That can get repetitive…on the other hand, you have guys like the Mandarin.  A Magical Asian.  So they went with…um…Whiplash.  I wondered how they could make that interesting  They kind of succeeded.

Whiplash is obsessed with Stark because he feels Stark’s father betrayed his father.  The other villain in the film is Tony’s weaker competitor, Justin Hammer.  Hammer is trying to give the government the same kind of technology Stark has.  Ultimately they achieve it by using Whiplash, who has knowledge of Tony’s tech..  The film also introduces us to Natasha Romanoff, also known as the the Black Widow.  Whiplash is freed from the authorities by Hammer who wants to use his expertise.  Hammer is cocky, but he he is less competent than Tony or Whiplash, who double crosses Hammer to get his revenge on Tony.

There is a lot to like here.  But the best stuff is almost all at the end.  We get Stark and Rhodey fighting together against Hammer’s drones, Black Widow kicking butt and just a lot of cool stuff.  But at times, it feels like it is taking forever to get there.  This film has the exact opposite issue of the first film.  The build up is not all that involving as an audience member, but the ending is great.

Again, the chemistry between Downey and Paltrow is magnetic.  And Cheadle slides right into the role like he was always there.  Johansson gives us just a taste of the character to come, and it is great.  Rockwell is wonderfully sleazy as Justin Hammer.  Samuel L. Jackson’s Nick Fury is established as a major player tying the Marvel Cinematic Universe together.

Iron Man 2 is not quite the follow up I would have hoped for, but it would not sink the franchise or the MCU either.   It is one of the weakr entries, but strong enough to not be totally dismissed.

The Iron Age (Iron Man, 2008)

IRON MANSimply described as: How to start building your bigger, badder franchise.

Iron Man has a history going back to 1990 in attempts to bring it to the screen.  Stuart Gordon (Re-Animator) was on board for Universal…years later, Nick Cage and Tom Cruise sought the role of Tony Stark.  When They announced Director Jon Favreau as director and Robert Downey Jr. as Tony Stark/Iron Man, there seemed to be a collective “Meh.”  I get why Favreau was not instantly met with a cheer.  He had three films to his credit as director.  The idea that he had the chops as director to take on something of this level certainly was at least hinted at with Zarthura… but I was more perplexed by the indifference to the ever talented Downy Jr.  He seemed all to well suited for the role of a care free playboy that is Tony Stark.

The film opens in Afghanistan, with Stark riding in a Humvee.  He has some playful banter with the soldiers, before they fall under attack.  The film does a terrific job of switching the tones from the casual goofing off at the start to the harrowing action and destruction that follows.  After diving behind a rock, Tony is surprised as a rocket lands next to him… Stark noticed his logo on the side of the rocket as it explodes.  We see rough shots of men holding him captive before jumping back in time.  We discover that Stark lives a pretty carefree life…he pays little attention to time, does not worry about losing large sums of cash while gambling and has a way with the ladies.  He seduces a reporter only to leave dealing with her the next morning to his personal assistant Pepper Potts (Gwyneth Paltrow).  He’s a genius who is constantly trying to occupy his mind (playing with cars) but also a terrific pitchman.

When we get back to Afghanistan, Tony discovers he is a prisoner of the  Ten Rings, along with Dr. Yinsen (Shaun Toub) who saved Tony’s life.  The Ten Rings want Tony to build them a new weapon.  For parts, they show him a massive collection of Stark weaponry.  Tony refuses to help.  Once alone, Yinsen compels Tony to use his talents to fight back.  Under the guise of agreeing to make the new weapon, Tony starts designing and building a means of escape.  First, he builds a new version of the magnet repealing shrapnel from his heart.  One that does not require a car battery.

It turns out to be a suit of  armor.  In a thrilling escape, Tony fights the minions of the Tenth Circle, but losing Yinsen in the process.  One of the nice things that the script and performances manage is a convincing friendship between the two, so Yinsen’s death feels like it truly impacts start and that he is both heartbroken and angry at the loss.  After returning to the states, Tony calls for a press conference where he announces-much to the shock of his second in command Obediah Stane (Jeff Bridges)-he is taking Stark Industries out of the Military Industrial Complex.  We also meet an important character to the Marvel movie franchise.  Agent Phil Colson (Clark Gregg) introduces himself to Pepper, wanting to discuss Tony’s escape.

Obediah seems to be an understanding and caring guy.  He’s concerned about the future of the company, but seems to think they can make it work based off of the mini-arc reactor in Tony’s chest (the magnet in his chest).  Tony starts to upgrade his reactor and build a new suit of armor.  There are a lot of fun scenes with Tony stumbling through building high tech armor.  This leaves Tony concerned about his friendship with  Lt. Col. James Rhodes (Terrence Howard).  Rhodey is seemingly frustrated that he sees Stark walking away from helping the military.

Stane reveals he locked Tony out of the company, as Tony is pushing for a more peaceable direction for the company.  Seeing news about the Tenth Circle in Afghanistan, Tony suits up and hurtles through the sky.  He takes out the Tenth Circle, destroying their weapons.  He gets the attention of U.S. Military, which leads to an exciting cat and mouse game with Tony and two fighter jets.

Stane works to build a much bigger and more aggressive suit of armor. Of course, Stane and Tony come to blows in an big armor battle.

The chemistry between Tony and Pepper is excellent.  It is playful, flirty and not overwrought with melodrama.  Paltrow was a terrific choice and the character really shines.  Downy Jr. and Paltrow are able to really make the relationship sell with the audience.

Downey Jr is terrific in the role.  He seems to effortlessly move from fun and flirtation to passionate and intense focus.  At no point does he seem like an ill fit for the part…Tony Stark works in this film because you believe Downey Jr.

Bridges makes a terrific Obediah Stane.  He seems so kind and generous at the beginning, but when the charm needs to give way to menace, he really pulls it off.  Howard’s Rhodey is a nicely handled role.  He is a pro as a soldier, but he knows his friend well, and commits to helping him in any way he can.

Again, watching Tony develop the new armor provides a lot of laughs (Tony gets hurt a lot).  His mechanical assistants seems full of personality and humor as we watch them work together.  The armor effects are terrific and give the illusion of weight and mass that feels like it was on the set.  It feels like it really would be functional.  Even when they deviate (such as Jarvis being an A.I. instead of a real person) it often favors the film.

I felt the biggest flaw in the film was the end battle.  It felt tacked on, like they suddenly realized they were almost at the end and had not resolved the main conflict with Stane.  It’s almost to quick, and honestly a little confusing as to how the giant arc reactor was impacting what was going on (it seems to hurt Stane, but help Tony).

All in all, Iron Man was an exciting and fun film, cementing the idea that Marvel movies were fun and exciting rides…but that they also had solid performances and decent-if not outright terrific-stories.  Of course, while it was exciting that they were doing something new-a movie universe-it was hard to tell if this would be a successful venture or a failed experiment.

Player vs Player (Captain America: Civil War, 2016)

Marvels_captain_america_civil_war_posterCaptain America: Civil War was a risky gamble.  It has a bloated cast.  I mean, Captain America is joined by practically everyone (Except Thor and the Hulk).  The film was also going to be introducing us to a couple Major Players in Both the Black Panther and Spider-Man.  There was always the possibility that this would be so bogged down, we would have Marvels first failure…the first Marvel film that outright sucked.

And the film should be a huge mess.  We are being introduced to characters left and right.  And as usual, the villain of the film is pretty thin.  And yet, somehow?  The film works.  It stand and manages to remain extremely engaging.  The film is dealing with the fallout of collateral damage we have seen through the previous films.  All that destruction we have seen through the Avengers, Thor, Captain America the winter soldier.  Culminating in an event in this film in which an attempt to save people kills several visiting Wakandans.

The United Nations is determine to intervene.  And Tony Stark, after being confronted by an angry and heartbroken mother (Alfre Woodard) whose son died in Ultron’s Sokovia attack, is determine to see it happen.  He, quite understandable, sees a need for Oversight.  And this is what sets off the Conflict within the Avengers.  Steve Rogers is certain that being shackled and having to get permission to fight the bad guys is a bad idea.  We of course, sympathize with Cap, but one of the things the film does very well?  The character motivations.  They make sense.  You understand why they choose the way they do.  And the the fact that certain characters miss the villain’s big plan is quite believable.

The film is action packed, but not at the expense of the overall story.  The characters get meaningful exchanges and yet, the film avoids feeling overly bogged down by a sense of self importance.  The events matter, questions are asked, but without the self aggrandizing approach other Super-hero films had recently.  Not naming names.  The cast does great work with the script they were given.  They bring the characters to life.

And then there is the humor.  This is by no means a light film, but it has very effective humor.  The film is not afraid that if we laugh we might miss “the important and heavy epic story being told”.  These people are friends.  They have history.  They care about each other.  And that is what gives the story it’s real conflict and weight.  But it is also those established relationships that allow the fun.

Of course, the big question was…Spider-Man and the Black Panther-will they work?  It is nice that we do not get an origin story (it should be pretty clear that T’Challa was already the Black Panther, he is not becoming the Black Panther for revenge).  But he does get a nice story arc focusing on the thirst for vengeance, leading him to wisdom in his new role as King.  Chadwick Boseman plays T’Challa as young, confident royalty.  And yet, when he suffers lost, he gains a restrained ferocity.

And Tom Holland?  He is Spider-Man.  The portrayal of Spidey in this film was almost instantly lovable.  His rapid fire chatter was dead on.  He looked great in costume and his position of siding with Tony makes complete sense.  I am genuinely excited to see both Spider-Man and Black Panther’s solo films.

James Gunn (Director of the Guardians of the Galaxy films) said this was the best Marvel film to date.  And, in the end, if it is not actually the best?  It is pretty darn close.  This is a terrific adventure and worth seeing.

Science Gone Mad Part 2 (Wierd Science, 1985)

weird_science_posterJohn Hughes’ juvenile take on Mary Poppins and genies should really be more problematic than it often is.

Released in 1985, the film pandered to boyish nerd fantasies.  It focuses on downtrodden super nerds Wyatt and Gary.  Both are obsessed with girls while being relentless humiliated by bullies.  It is, of course a common trope meant to garner sympathy.  Anthony Michael Hall had not yet broken free of the nerd role established in Sixteen Candles.  The same year Weird Science was released, Hall was in Hughes’ the Breakfast Club with a bit more thoughtful approach to this type of character.  But his Gary is in the Nerd Who Wants to Be Popular vein.

So when so when his best friend Wyatt’s family is out of town for a weekend, the hijinks begin.  Truthfully, Ilan Mitchell-Smith’s Wyatt is more sympathetic.  He is steamrolled by everyone.  He is less concerned about being popular than just succeeding and getting the girl.

To try and figure out their problems with girls, they decide to put their genius to use and create a girl to question on their computer.  It all gets out of hand and somehow they manage to create a real woman.  Kind of.  Kelly LeBrock’s Lisa is a teen boy’s fantasy woman in every sense.  Forward, sexy and she has magic powers.  Somehow, they created a genie.  And she is eager to please her masters.  And this is where it should get tremendously troubling.  Except, they are not confident of their role.  Instead, Lisa takes over and starts making their decisions for them.  She takes the stands they are scared to take.  She takes them out on the town.  She throws a party.  She is protective of Gary and Wyatt, but wants to push them to be more assertive and not run away from adversity to cower in the bathroom.

The film certainly has it’s fun moments, and it has a good cast that help make it easier to ignore just how absurd the plot is.  Bill Paxton as Wyatt’s jerk big brother Chet is especially memorable, including his comeuppance.  But it also has some dull stretches.  The jokes are often hit or miss.  The party sequence is just bizarre, with an endless parade of absurd ideas for showing off effects.

All in all, this one of Hughes weaker efforts.  It is mindless fun, but the heart that should be there is missing.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑